Don’s sister Debbie came to visit us over the weekend. I haven’t blogged for a while, and she graciously agreed to be our very first guest blogger. Thanks Deb!

At the beginning of my visit with Don and Justina, I was bribed early on to pick up the blog and give my perspective on the weekend. My mind experienced a “twist” over that request because generally speaking, my visits with them have always been pure magic, in a personal way. This is my family. They love me without question, and that is a cherished feeling. I’ll do pretty much anything they ask, so here we go…

We started the weekend with immediate cheers to being together again, and headed down to the barn to say hello to my larger nieces and nephews. Donkey greetings are always a highlight because whenever Don or Justina get within range of sight, the boyz and girlz are nearly bursting with joy. There was so much excitement that we took Bernard and Ellsworth for a walk down a lovely quiet trail. I took some of the first pictures on this walk, that opened up to a large field with breathtaking views as the backdrop.

Bernard and Ellsworth

It was a quick walk because we were on a deadline to see the Virginia Military Institute dress parade happening that afternoon. Bernard and Ellsworth were safely tucked away, the Moo was secured, and we took off for downtown Lexington.

Meggie Moo

If you’ve never witnessed a dress parade, understand that the process is amazing to both see and feel. The uniforms are sharp. Actions are precise and with purpose.

Virginia Military Institute

Feeling pride in your country is hard to avoid as you pay respect to our great flag and nation. There is no better country than the United States of America.

Dress parade

Upon returning home, Don decided it would be awesome to have me touch the electric fence. Generally speaking, I’d like to think I am smarter than this. Unfortunately, my love for family and trust for my brother brings out the stupid in me. He knows this and continues to trick his little sister without mercy. Note in the photo that Don is touching the fence. I inspected him carefully. He wasn’t sweating. He wasn’t twitching. He was very matter of fact that it was no big deal.  So, okay, I’ll touch the damn fence.  Had Justina said ANYTHING at this point it would have been helpful. She opted to stay in the barn and snicker quietly. If any of you visit, don’t fall for this. My howling in pain sent the donkeys racing halfway up the hill. Don giggled like a school girl. He may be El Diablo in disguise.

Don

Harriet was not pleased.

Harriet

My favorite spot on the farm is the gazebo.

Gazebo

We spent most of the weekend here, blazing a trail to the fridge and back. The dogs visit at will, donkeys are visible, and we can watch moo wander around.

Suni

There is something about sitting there, hearing the breeze flow over the hill, birds chirping along with the wind chimes, and listening to music about popping tops and fried chicken, while sipping on some beers that let you know you’re doing life right.

Gazebo

Another fine weekend at Morning Bray Farm. I’m feeling blessed.

Don and Deb

Deb and Justina

 

Daffodils

Hydrangea

Don and I visited Luray Caverns last week. It’s a bit touristy, but still breathtaking in spots.

This is Dream Lake, the largest body of water in the caverns. However, its deepest point is not more than 18 to 20 inches. The “lake” creates a mirror image of the stalactites hanging from the ceiling.

Luray1

According to the National Geographic Society, Luray Caverns has some of the most perfectly formed translucent drapery formations known:

Luray2

The white formation in the background of this photo is Titania’s Veil. It’s made of pure calcite, the result of spreading crystalline deposits. These deposits, commonly called flowstone, spread laterally coating walls or ceilings.

Luray3

From a Washington Post article:

The slogan says famously that Virginia is for lovers, but it’s also for cavers.The land is riddled with them. Virginia is the only state with an independent cave board, and the bureaucrats have identified more than 4,000 caves, ranging from shallow crevices to expanses spidering under the hills and hollows along the limestone backbone that runs northeast from Bristol to Front Royal.

Luray4

For my mom, the fried eggs:

Luray5

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