Up until Monday, we were referring to Izzy and her brood as “Izzy and the kids.” On Monday evening, after making what was for us a very difficult decision, Don took Izzy’s two boys (drakes) to a new home. I never figured it would be so hard and that I’d feel so bad seeing them leave Morning Bray Farm.

Izzy wasn’t happy about seeing the boys go either, but she still has her girls.

They’ll be nine weeks old on Sunday and they’re still growing like weeds.

♥ ♥ ♥

Izzy’s ducklings will be five weeks old on Sunday.

I swear they grow bigger with every breath they take.

Their feetsies are getting ginormous and they’re already sprouting feathers.

We haven’t named any of them yet, but one still looks like Izzy Junior.

Izzy loves her babies.

♥ ♥ ♥

♥ ♥ ♥

Izzy became a mother for the first time on Sunday.

She’s a very protective mom and is doing a great job with her five babies. One duckling in particular is a carbon copy of Izzy as a wee babe. Recognize the Izzy smile?

Izzy as a wee duckling:

Everyone hatched out just fine, but Don thought it best to give duckling #4 a bit of help since it was taking an extremely long time to break out:

Interestingly, Izzy was completely okay with the help.

Everyone is doing just fine now:

Eating and drinking and frolicking… even if never far from Izzy:

Meanwhile, Emmy is sitting on 13 eggs, which we expect to hatch next week. 

It’s a good thing we love little baby ducks.

♥ ♥ ♥

Guess who’s broody?

For a week now, Izzy has been sitting on a beautiful nest. With the exception of a few minutes each day when she gets up to take care of things, she refuses to budge.

She has plenty to say when we enter her stall to remove her daily egg:

We’re not ready for ducklings yet, so we’re letting her sit, but not letting her keep her eggs:

She does, however, have a fake wooden egg that she’s taking very good care of:

broody

1510s, “apt to breed,” from brood (q.v.). Figuratively, of persons, from 1851. Also, in modern use, sometimes “full of maternal yearning.”
 
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Every now and then, I look out the front door to see something like this:

Oliver loves to nuzzle his bill into the crook of Izzy’s neck:

Beautiful Izzy still looks like she’s always smiling:

They make a very cute couple:

They’re our Morning Bray Farm lovebirds:

Love, love, love.

♥ ♥ ♥

Emmy getting out of her bath at 31° F:

Canada goose in the alfalfa field:

Gracie Belle and Buck:

Izzy, with her beautiful, blue eyes:

Colors in the barn:

9/27 Update: The girls gifted us with a double-yolker right out of the gate.

Don fried it up for us last night. Delish! The consistency of the egg white was extremely thick, but Don said it tasted just like a fresh chicken egg. 

As for me, my mind played games with me at first, thanks to my dear husband. After I took my first bite, Don said, “Why are you eating your grandchildren?!”

Aaack! Once I got past that, I agreed with him. It was a delicious, fresh egg. Not gamey or weird at all.

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9/26 Post: We irrigated our pasture yesterday for one of the last times this season. We’ve gotten into the habit of putting the ducks out in the pasture on irrigation days because they love being ducks.

We found everyone and got them into the pasture, but Izzy was nowhere to be found. Finally, Don found her under a holly bush near the house. I heard him gently shoo her from where she sat and then heard him exclaim, “Oh my!”

Here’s what Izzy was sitting on:

Once Izzy was out in the pasture being a duck, I collected the eggs and took them into the house. The three smaller eggs were cold, but the large egg was warm. I figured that means Izzy had just laid it.

Oh, the eggcitement!

Just look at what Izzy did:

Pretty impressive, don’t you think? Once I finished oohing and aahing over the eggs, I put them in an egg carton to store in the refrigerator. The lid didn’t close all the way on the corner where Izzy’s egg sat:

Thank you, sweet Izzy:

Thank you, sweet Hillary:

And thank you in advance, sweet Emmy:

Our next step is getting the girls to use the nesting boxes in Duckingham Palace:

We irrigated our pasture yesterday for one of the last times this season. We’ve gotten into the habit of putting the ducks out in the pasture on irrigation days because they love being ducks.

We found everyone and got them into the pasture, but Izzy was nowhere to be found. Finally, Don found her under a holly bush near the house. I heard him gently shoo her from where she sat and then heard him exclaim, “Oh my!”

Here’s what Izzy was sitting on:

Once Izzy was out in the pasture being a duck, I collected the eggs and took them into the house. The three smaller eggs were cold, but the large egg was warm. I figured that means Izzy had just laid it.

Oh, the eggcitement!

Just look at what Izzy did:

Pretty impressive, don’t you think? Once I finished oohing and aahing over the eggs, I put them in an egg carton to store in the refrigerator. The lid didn’t close all the way on the corner where Izzy’s egg sat:

Thank you, sweet Izzy:

Thank you, sweet Hillary:

And thank you in advance, sweet Emmy:

Our next step is getting the girls to use the nesting boxes in Duckingham Palace: