Farm


I suppose it’s finally time to spill the beans. In just a few short weeks, Don and I, the dogs, the donkeys and Meggie Moo are moving to Virginia.

Charlottesville

It certainly wasn’t an easy decision. New Mexico is the Land of Enchantment! There is so much we will miss about this ruggedly beautiful state and the original Morning Bray Farm. We’ll have a heckuva lot of people to miss, too.

We’re moving east to be closer to our parents, other family and old friends. We’ve chosen the Charlottesville area as where we’d like to establish the next Morning Bray Farm.

In the interim while we get the lay of the land, we’ve found the perfect farm to rent in Lexington, Virginia.

Lexington

The dogs will have a picket-fenced yard and the donkeys will have almost eight acres of gently rolling pasture with a brand new barn. As she does here, Meggie Moo will run the place.

Lexington2

We’re both excited and terrified, and we’re looking forward to our next adventure in the Old Dominion State.

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Rainbow sunrise

Rainbow sunrise2

Rainbow sunrise3

2013

 

 

I haven’t done Saturday Parts or Saturday Stuff in a long time, so I figure now’s as good a time as any to share pictures that I don’t know what to do with or don’t fit in a post of their own.

The ducklings. Back when innocence ruled and they all sought each other out for comfort. I think this photo was probably taken sometime in June of last year:


This jack used to live on the other side of the alfalfa pasture behind Morning Bray Farm:

Sadly, he was alone and brayed a lot, especially after Gracie came to live with us. We called him the “donkey in the distance” or DITD (Diddy). Later, because we believe that all donkeys deserve dignified names, we named him Eugene and called him E. Diddy. We walked to visit with him and give him scritches every weekend. He’s gone now; we don’t know what happened to him.

And last for this week, a nest in our barn. I’ve never seen a “sideways nest” and am wondering what kind of bird this might belong to. Sparrows, maybe?

While Don’s sister Debbie was here for a visit last weekend, we decided to take a walk around the neighborhood. We saw llamas:

And sheep:

And cows:

And horses, and goats, and chickens…

We were footloose and fancy-free until we showed up at our second herd of llamas. This llama was very unhappy with our arrival and made sure to tell us by growling and showing us his teeth. I had never seen this behavior before:
 

I’m sure it had everything to do with this:

We got really worried when we saw this though:

Our friend Danni at Critter Farm once warned us what happens when a llama pins its ears back. It’s not meant to be pretty.

Since we weren’t sure after the fact that we interpreted the llama drama correctly, I consulted with Danni. Here’s what she wrote back:

Ok, here’s what I can tell you about this photo.  One llama has ears upright and forward facing…a sign of being interested, curious, and not at all on the defensive.  The second llama with the ears flat is concerned about something, but isn’t yet ready to spit.  Generally, there are two phases to spitting and there are definite warning signs:  1) the ears go back and 2) the head goes up.  Most llamas really do try to threaten or warn their adversaries that they are about to make a serious move prior to spitting.  I don’t think this guy was quite yet ready to spew.  For one thing, it’s quite a commitment. It is smelly, nasty stuff that comes out of their mouths.  Once they spit, they generally have to stand around for a while, jaws hanging open, trying to air their mouths out.  🙂

Daddy llama was simply doing a very good job of protecting his baby:

While at the same time being very courteous by withholding his spit:

Thanks for keeping your head down, Baby Daddy. 

And thanks for educating us, Danni. ♥

Baby Kassie 2 – Squirrels 0

♥ ♥ ♥

 

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